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Explore comments, opinions, images and video from Classical Futures events across Europe. 

“Declaring classical music to be dead, or on its last legs, is a popular critical sport. Audiences are described as ageing, performers as out of touch with the contemporary zeitgeist and concert halls as archaic bastions of privilege. Sadly, these charges are too often accurate. The notions of the classical artist as superhuman, of the music as an untouchable canon and the concert hall as a temple are outdated in today’s world, and often serve to alienate potential audiences and performers alike.”

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“Declaring classical music to be dead, or on its last legs, is a popular critical sport. Audiences are described as ageing, performers as out of touch with the contemporary zeitgeist and concert halls as archaic bastions of privilege. Sadly, these charges are too often accurate. The notions of the classical artist as superhuman, of the music as an untouchable canon and the concert hall as a temple are outdated in today’s world, and often serve to alienate potential audiences and performers alike.”

Read More